Lee's Menagerie
Melding Science & Magic

Cockatrices

 

Cockatrices

 
 
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Species

European Cockatrice Chick

Habitat:

Found in rocky crags and caverns in the highest mountains.

Diet:

Small rodents, lizards, and any other prey they can catch. Cockatrices will also eat dragonsbane to help aid in production of their venom glands.

Characteristics:

Legend has it a Cockatrice is hatched when a snake incubates a chicken’s egg under the full moon for seven years. Perhaps this is how the first cockatrices came into being, but we no longer find the use of snakes to be an important part of the incubation process. The European Cockatrice does seem a bit more ancient in comparison to its North American counterpart. The European has much thicker body armor and looks more primal and dinosaur-like in appearance. The European Cockatrice is also quite large, with the chicks standing nearly a full foot tall, and the adults occasionally reaching four feet in height. Fortunately the European Cockatrice is extremely rare, found only at the top of the most dizzying summits. Because if their precarious habitat, very few European Cockatrice’s have found their way into the magical creature trade.

 
 

 
 

Species

North American Cockatrice Chick

Habitat:

Most commonly observed in the wildness surrounding farmland, the occasional cockatrice may take to living on the outskirts of the farm itself, picking off livestock as easy meals. Due to the close proximity, some farmers skilled in magical creature care have begun domesticating this species of cockatrice and using them to protect their homesteads.

Diet:

In the wild, North American Cockatrices subsist entirely off of small game, but domesticated diets often consist of one part grain and two parts ground beef.

Characteristics:

Smaller and more chicken-like than their European cousins, this species of Cockatrice is less threatening as well. They lack the ability to spit venom, or turn other creatures to stone with their gaze. Nevertheless, adult cockatrices should be properly trained, and never approached in the wild, as their stare can result in mild, temporary paralysis. Those wishing to keep Cockatrices must be willing to give up any roosters on the premises, as the crow of a rooster can prove fatal to some cockatrice breeds.